brands Archives — Carrington Malin

November 5, 2020
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Legendary marketing pioneer and author Philip Kotler defines brand positioning as ‘the act of designing the company’s offering and image to occupy a distinctive place in the mind of the target market’. Positioning is a critical component in the promotion of any venture, from advertising and public relations, to sales and customer relationship management (CRM), even having an impact on the structure and policies of growing companies. Founders tend to work hard on positioning their ventures, but a chain is only as strong as its weakest link.

In these days of Internet learning, it’s easy to read about the role of positioning, see examples of what it looks like and find out how to go about developing your own positioning statement. It’s something that’s top of mind for all founders, whether they realise that it’s positioning or not. Finding a process that works for you can help you crystalise your value proposition and create a clear positioning statement.

Nevertheless, developing strong positioning that differentiates your brand from competitors and aligns exactly with your business strategy, is easier said than done. Our end result in developing brand positioning is defining how we could like our customers to think and feel about our brand, but for this actually to be the case, positioning must work well across every aspect of our brand, marketing and communications.

If your business proposition is not receiving the recognition that it deserves, internally or externally, this could be due to a weak point in your positioning strategy. Here are five reasons why your brand positioning may not be working for you.

Continue reading this story on SME10x.com.


August 11, 2020
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Will AI replace human creativity? Or help them take creativity to the next level? It could simply depend on how we choose to use it.

As the capabilities of AI continue to grow, the creative process may look less and less like the process of old. However, whether this process remains human-centric, is going to depend on how we frame AI’s future role. If AI is to super-charge human creativity, it’s up to creative professionals to take firm hold of the controls and remain at the very centre of the creative process.

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Read the Arabic language version here: نظرة على مستقبل الإبداع


November 2, 2019
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Do brands need AI avatars of themselves? Last week at London’s One Young World Summit, Biz Stone co-founder of Twitter and Lars Buttler, CEO of San Francisco-based The AI Foundation, announced a new concept they called ‘personal media’ and claimed that artificial intelligence is the future of social change. The Foundation is working on new technology that Buttler says will allow anyone to create an AI avatar of themselves, which would look like them, talk like them and act like them. Empowered by AI avatars, people will then be able to, potentially, have billions of conversations at the same time.

So, what does this new kind of AI communications mean for brands?

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September 25, 2019
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Despite the proclamations of enhanced customer experience, much of the interest and deployment of chatbots today is driven by cost savings. Customer service departments and the CFOs that approve their budgets have an opportunity to significantly reduce HR costs and add a new service that also has the prospect of being a revenue generator.

However, there are good reasons why large companies replacing human customer service with an automated customer service agent should consider chatbot projects as brand and customer experience initiatives first, and not simply a software roll-out.

Continue reading this story on Linkedin.


September 10, 2019
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More than half of employers don’t have a written policy on the ethical use of AI or bots, whilst AI chatbots and how they interact with customers play a growing role in shaping brand perceptions.

If you’ve implemented a new AI chatbot platform, then your brand’s chatbot can be made available to customers 24/7, respond instantly to queries and resolve up to 80 percent of questions without the need to involve a human customer service agent. However, customer service agents are generally bound by contracts, employee codes of conduct and operating procedures. Do the same rules apply for your chatbot?

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August 29, 2019
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Many companies have discussions about their brand’s personality, whether brought on by a brand development exercise, or the question of how their brand comes across in TV advertising or, perhaps, how it is seen and heard on social media. Is the brand playful or serious? Traditional or nonconformist? Conservative or outrageous? Does it have a sense of humour?

Often these personality attributes remain somewhat latent. Companies that see their brands as risk takers or eccentric, often find that they don’t particularly want to broadcast the fact for fear of upsetting their conservative customers. Likewise, marketers who feel that their brands can have a little bit of fun on social media, because it is expected of them by other social media users, often don’t use the same sort of fun persona for other communications.

So, where does this all leave us when it comes to conversational marketing?

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January 15, 2018
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After a decade of brands being tried and tested by social media, another new medium is set to challenge brand integrity: AI-powered voice technology. This new voice-controlled world will not only test brand differentiation, but also how enduring a brand’s relationship is with its consumers.

A new medium is set to challenge brand integrity. A disruptive force that could wreak havoc on carefully crafted communications guidelines and brand management methodologies: voice technology. The rise of voice assistants, voice-controlled devices and 24-hour a day, on-demand voice content is going to stretch even the most agile marketing organisations as they are forced to re-examine what their brand’s tone-of-voice really means to them.

This is a new world where your computer, mobile, home electronics, home automation, security and even your car are going to be voice-controlled. From a consumer point of view, this means that , in the near future, product discovery, pre-purchase research, second opinions, price comparison, buying transactions, user manuals and after-sales service will all be enabled by voice automation, voice content and AI-powered voice.

Continue reading this story on the Spot On blog.


November 28, 2017
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Donald Trump’s habit of repeatedly ‘crying wolf’ over media stories has played a big part in pushing ‘fake news’ into the public consciousness this year. However, fake news is a real problem. In fact, fake content of all kinds is a problem: and one that is going to reach enormous proportions over the next few years, misleading consumers, journalists, students, voters and other seekers of truth in the process. A content war is coming and fake content is already starting to carry the big guns.

Global research and advisory firm Garter predicts that by 2020, “most people in mature economies will consume more false information than true information”. This onslaught of fake content is being enabled by artificial intelligence (AI).

Continue reading this story on the Spot On blog.


November 28, 2017
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Much is being made of Amazon’s Alexa voice recognition technology and the voice platform’s ability to recognise speech and respond to voice requests. Early adopters of Alexa assistants seem to be delighted with the ease at which they can discover new content, control other devices. participate in interactive content and make onlin purchases. However, the best is probably still to come. As artificial intelligence (AI) develops further and leverages other technologies, digital assistants are likely to begin anticipating your needs rather than simply serving them efficiently.

Could artificial intelligence powered digital assistants, such as Alexa, take de facto control of your daily routine? And, if so, how much influence could they wield over your brand choices?

Continue reading this story on the Spot On blog.